Tag Archives: UFC

CM Punk Chants Continue From The WWE Universe

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      Editor’s Note: In March of this year, we posted an article titled Why We Chant For CM Punk. Although Punk has long since moved on to greener, more bruised pastures, this post is still one of our most clicked links from search engines and so we are doing an updated version of it here. 

      Last night, Monday Night Raw came to us from Cincinnati, OH. The fans began chanting for CM Punk during the Cruiserweight match. It was a disrespectful move to Tony Neese and our Cruiserweight Champion, TJ Perkins, but it almost seems unavoidable. No matter how often Punk stresses that he is done with WWE, fans continue to not only chant his name, but bring signs catered to him at live events.

      Punk made his UFC debut in Cleveland, Ohio on September 10th against Mickey Gall. He was submitted via rear naked choke at 2 minutes and 14 seconds in the first round. Punk outlasted Gall’s last opponent, who submitted at the 45 second mark in the first round. After 20 months of training and two surgeries, Punk made a strong debut regardless of what the haters may say. He refused to give up until there was no other option and lasted longer than many of his fellow fighters could have. Still, it was a dismal debut.

      I was genuinely nervous during Punk’s UFC fight. I have never been so invested in two short minutes. It was heartbreaking, exciting, and put my husband and I through a whirlwind of emotions in just a few seconds. Current and past WWE stars have had mixed reviews on his debut, ranging from “uncomfortable” and a sign that he should pursue another career, to “inspiring” and a great effort for a first fight.

      As can be expected, a lot of people have hinted that his so-called failure in UFC should prompt Punk to return to WWE where he is already established as a winner. Not an event goes by in his hometown of Chicago where we don’t see fans wearing his shirts and hear at least one crowd chant for his appearance. And as we saw on Monday Night RAW, Punk is clearly still over as a fan favorite.

      We can probably safely say that Punk will never set foot in a WWE ring again, and we can also safely say that the chants won’t stop for a long time. It’s not about the hope of him returning anymore, we’re past that. We chant for CM Punk because us Punk fans respect the hell out of the man. Even though he isn’t watching Monday Night Raw, we chant his name and hope somehow he knows how much we appreciate what he has done for professional wrestling. Regardless of where he goes from here, we’ll be supporting him and looking for any excuse to chant his name.


Article by Mrs. Jamie Bakermrsjcb

@OhhhTweener

The Number of WWE Injuries Continue to Grow

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      We recently brought you news on the rumored Wellness Violation that hung over Sasha Banks’ head. Fans will be happy to know that there was no truth to that rumor, but unfortunately our former women’s champion is dealing with a back injury. Banks is scheduled for an evaluation with doctors due to the pain she is dealing with in the lower lumbar area of her back. The official word is still out, but we hear that she will not require surgery and should be back in action within the next few weeks.

      Not so lucky is our first Universal Champion, Finn Balor. His shoulder was injured during his Summerslam match against Seth Rollins when Balor absorbed a running power bomb to the barricade. His shoulder dislocated, and Balor popped it right back in and continued the match. The MRI that followed showed a possible labrum tear, which will require surgery and have Balor out of action for 4 to 6 months. This truly could not have come at a worse time for Balor, who was really taking off on the main roster.

      Speaking of Summerslam, Brock Lesnar treated us to an ending worthy of the octagon, as he wailed on Randy Orton, hitting him with hard punches and elbows that resulted in Orton being left in a puddle of his own blood. Orton required ten staples to close the laceration on his forehead. There is a lot of speculation on whether or not Lesnar went too far with his attack, but we’ll leave that to you to decide.

      NXT’s Samoa Joe suffered a dislocated jaw during his title match with our new NXT Champion Shinsuke Nakamura. Joe was hit with two Kinshasa knee strikes, causing the dislocation of his mandible. Joe tweeted out that his jaw was dislocated, relocated, and he looks forward to being cleared soon. The severity of the injury is still unknown, so we’re not sure when we’ll see him back in action.

      Also still out of action is Luke Harper, who suffered a knee injury and underwent successful surgery, Sting, who suffered a neck injury, Emma, who underwent back surgery, and Tyson Kidd who suffered a neck injury and underwent successful surgery. There is no timetable for any of their returns. Paige is also suffering neck and back injuries that she is personally working to strengthen. She is currently suspended due to a Wellness Policy Violation, so we may or may not see her back in the ring when the suspension lifts. We wish everyone a speedy recovery and will bring you updates as they become available.


Article by Mrs Jamie BakerIMG_20140926_193145

@OhhhTweener

New York State Athletic Commission Conveniently Keeps Their Hands Clean Regarding Brock Lesnar

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      It was announced earlier this month that Brock Lesnar would face Randy Orton at SummerSlam. Also, earlier this month Lesnar defeated Mark Hunt at UFC 200 in dominant fashion. A few days after the event, allegations surfaced that Lesnar was flagged by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) for having banned substance in his drug test. The actual substance has yet to be released publically by the USADA, but it has led many to speculate whether or not this would jeopardize Lesnar’s participation at the SummerSlam pay-per-view in Brooklyn, New York.

      When asked, the New York State Athletic Commission (NYSAC, which is a great acronym by the way) skirted the issue by putting out the following statement in regards to regulating Lesnar and WWE’s pro-wrestling:

      ‘In 2002, New York State passed legislation that scaled back the regulation of “professional wrestling” in many respects based on a recognition that the activity is entertainment rather than bona-fide athletic competition. Under current New York State law, “professional wrestling” is defined as wrestling “primarily for the purpose of providing entertainment to spectators and which does not comprise a bona fide athletic contest or competition” (NY Unconsolidated Laws section 8928-b[1]). As such, the State does not license individual wrestlers, and Mr. Lesnar is not a licensee of the New York State Athletic Commission. In the context of “professional wrestling,” as defined above, the State licenses only the promoter, such as the WWE. Per New York law, among other health and safety requirements that apply to the licensing of a promoter, the event promoter is required to have a physician examine each wrestler and determine whether each wrestler is medically fit to participate. The question of whether Mr. Lesnar is fit to participate in a “professional wrestling” event is one that will be determined by the application of the professional medical judgment of the examining physician, the policies of the WWE, and the choices made by Mr. Lesnar with regard to his own participation leading up to the event date.’

      In essence, NYSAC was saying in very convoluted terms that as long as WWE is okay with it, so are they. And since Lesnar is the cream in Vince McMahon’s pants, as well as the poster-boy for WWE2k17, it’s unlikely WWE is going to do a damn thing about it. While it’s great from a pro-wrestling fan perspective that NYSAC isn’t preventing Lesnar from participation even if he gets suspended from MMA, it does show people just how much power and influence Vince has in New York. They don’t want to rock the boat because WWE is a big economy boost in NYC and you don’t bite the hand that feeds you.


Article by Jamie Curtis BakerFotoFlexer_Photo
@MrNotWell

Why We Chant For CM Punk

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      CM Punk has not been present in the WWE since early 2014, but that doesn’t stop fans from chanting his name, especially when a live event is held in his hometown of Chicago.  His departure with the WWE isn’t one that happened on the best terms, as he was “accidentally” terminated on his wedding day; the story is that no one realized he was getting married on that particular day, but I’m simply not buying it.  Punk chose to left for a long list of reasons, and considering the way he was treated and underutilized, I can’t blame him.  He has since moved on to sign with the UFC and will debut later this year (we hope).

      Even though Punk is done with the WWE, the fans are not done with him.  Prior to AJ Lee retiring, the Punk chants filled the arena when she would walk out; not very respectful to her, but I can understand the urge to do it.  When my husband and I attended the 2014 Payback PPV in Chicago, we chanted for Punk all night, plus had the signs and the shirts as we hoped he would come back.  The March 7, 2016 Raw in Chicago started off with a bang with Shane and Vince McMahon squaring off, and Vince ended up being interrupted by a booming “CM PUNK” chant as he berated his son.  On last night’s WWE Roadblock, Canadian fans started out the night with a spur of the moment Punk chant. We still see the signs, the t-shirts, and we will always have that group of fans that hold on to the sliver of hope that Punk will one day surprise us all with a triumphant return to the squared circle.  I personally don’t believe it will ever happen, but I’m guilty of thinking “what if” from time to time.

      We chant for Punk because he wasn’t lying when he printed Best In The World on his t-shirts.  When he was a heel, I truly hated him.  He didn’t resort to using easy insults to get booed, he made you want to punch him square in his smug face.  He tore down whoever the current hero was in a way that was uniquely his.  When he was a face, he demanded the crowd cheer for him without changing his personality or chasing cheap pops.  He seamlessly transitioned into whatever role was required without compromising the person he was.  His departure left a gaping hole in the WWE that no one has been able to fill yet.

      We chant for Punk because he brought something special to the WWE.  His infamous Pipe Bomb paved the way for countless other wrestlers to stop being afraid of the consequences of breaking the 4th wall, going off script, or speaking their mind.  His wife, for example, subsequently delivered one of the greatest promos a female wrestler has ever given in the WWE.  He made it okay to be a smart ass, to say things that were once forbidden, and to not give one single shit about what anyone thinks of you so long as you think the world of yourself.  He gave people the go ahead to have a backbone and to demand something better.

      We chant for Punk because his MMA debut is going to be a must-see event and is one of the most highly anticipated debuts in recent history.  You have the fans that have followed Punk from the beginning, those who only know him from the WWE, and then you have the group of people who detest the man and want to see him fail.  People on both ends of the spectrum are going to be buying the PPV, or at the very least scouring social media and YouTube for updates and video.  My husband and I have already decided to buy it, which will make it our very first UFC PPV purchase.

      We chant for Punk because he lives his life for himself, not for the fans.  He (and wife AJ) don’t post selfies at the gym or in their home.  His meals aren’t getting posted to Instagram, along with arsty photos of the park he jogged in this morning.  He lives a private life and doesn’t spend one second trying to win the approval of anybody.  His wedding was a private affair and he was pretty damn upset when a wedding photo leaked, stealing a moment meant for a few and giving it to the masses.  Punk remains shrouded in mystery, and it’s hard not to respect what he does to keep things that way.

      But most of all, we chant for Punk out of respect for everything that he has done during his career and for never giving in to pressure.  From his early days in 1999, to Ring of Honor, to ECW, to WWE, to Marvel’s comicbook landscape and now to the UFC, he has commanded every stage he’s set foot on.  He puts 100% of himself into everything he does.  When he doesn’t have 100% to give, he doesn’t waste his time trying to give anything at all.  His UFC debut will be one to watch, because Punk isn’t the type of person to waste time on something if he can’t conquer it in every possible way.  And when he finally walks out to that cage and touches gloves with his opponent, we will all loudly and enthusiastically chant for CM Punk.


Article by Mrs Jamie BakerIMG_20140926_193145

@OhhhTweener